Frequently Asked Questions

Paediasure Shake FAQs

 

Who is PaediaSure Shake for?

PaediaSure Shake is a specially formulated supplement drink for children aged 1-10 years. It can be a regular part of a child’s daily diet, while you work to establish healthy eating habits. It can be used to supplement their nutritional intake in-between meals or at snack times.

PaediaSure Shake is not intended for children with feeding difficulties or faltering growth due to underlying medical conditions, and is not a substitute for seeking medical advice.

If you have any concerns, please discuss these with your healthcare professional.

 
 

What flavours does PaediaSure Shake come in?

PaediaSure Shake is available in three flavours – vanilla, strawberry and chocolate – and children love the great taste which means less fuss, less stress and less worry for you.

PaediaSure Shake is not intended for children with feeding difficulties or faltering growth due to underlying medical conditions, and is not a substitute for seeking medical advice.

If you have any concerns, please discuss these with your healthcare professional.

 
 

How should PaediaSure Shake be prepared?

PaediaSure Shake is a powdered supplement which should be added to water, to make a delicious milkshake style drink.

To prepare one 225 ml serving, pour 190 ml of water into a glass and gradually mix in 5 level scoops of PaediaSure Shake powder, stirring until thoroughly mixed.

Please see our how to use PaediaSure Shake section for more guidance.

 
 

How many servings of PaediaSure Shake can my child have each day?

PaediaSure Shake should be used alongside or in-between meals, as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

Your child should have no more than the recommended daily allowance below of PaediaSure Shake, dependent on their age:

  • Up to 2 glasses for 1–4 year olds
  • Up to 3 glasses for 5–10 year olds
 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake suitable for a Kosher diet?

PaediaSure Shake is not suitable for a Kosher diet.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake suitable for Halal diets?

Yes, all flavours of PaediaSure Shake are suitable for a Halal diet.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake soya (soy) free?

PaediaSure Shake is not soya (soy) free.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake milk free?

PaediaSure Shake contains milk protein and therefore it is not milk free.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake gluten free?

Yes, all flavours of PaediaSure Shake are gluten free.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake lactose free?

Yes, all flavours of PaediaSure Shake are lactose free.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake suitable for a vegetarian diet?

Yes, all flavours of PaediaSure Shake are suitable for vegetarians.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake suitable for a vegan diet?

PaediaSure Shake is not suitable for those following a vegan diet, as it contains milk protein.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake nut free?

Yes, all flavours of PaediaSure Shake are nut free.

 
 

Is PaediaSure Shake free from genetically modified ingredients?

Yes, all flavours of PaediaSure Shake are free from genetically modified ingredients.

 

Fussyeaters FAQs

 

Why is my child a fussy eater?

Fussy eating can be caused by a number of things, including:

  • Food ‘neophobia’: A term used to describe fear of new foods, which is thought to derive from evolutionary ‘survival’ mechanism. For example, to avoid eating poisonous berries1
  • Your child - especially if they’re a toddler - may be experiencing a growing sense of independence - refusing food can be a way of asserting themselves2
  • Difficult behaviours, such as refusing foods, may occur due to a big or sudden change in a child’s life and environment, for example; moving house, starting playgroup or the birth of a sibling, and is a way for your child to seek attention3

A recent survey of caregivers showed that often people only made 3-5 attempts when introducing a child to a new food.4 However, research suggests that young children need more than 10 exposures to a new food before they accept it.5 Perseverance is key!

Take a look at our Six Sure Steps to raise a child who eats well and our Practical 12-week 'Back on Track' eating plan for tips and guidance to help support your child through their fussy eating phase. 

If you have any concerns, please discuss these with your healthcare professional.

 
 

How common is fussy eating in children?

Fussy eating is common in young children, with up to a third of children around two years of age going through this stage.2 Fussy eating can take the form of refusing to eat foods, a lack of interest in food, eating particularly slowly, and reduced appetite.6

 
 

Will my child grow out of being a fussy eater?

The good news is that this is usually a phase that children grow out of and they will eventually start to accept a wider range of foods.2 Nevertheless, for many parents, this fussy eating phase can cause a lot of stress, particularly at mealtimes. If you’re the parent of a fussy eater, it’s natural to be concerned that your child might be missing out on important nutrients. Mothers are concerned that a lack of adequate nutrition over a prolonged period of time at a young age can lead to slowed growth and development, susceptibility to illness, a lack of appetite, a lack of energy and a reduced ability to concentrate at school.7

Your child may have good and bad food days, so if your child doesn’t eat everything you give them at each meal it may not be a problem. It is important you look at what your child eats over a week rather than just a day or at each meal to get a better view.8 What a child eats is more important than when a child eats.

 
 

What important foods should my child be getting in his / her diet?

It is important that your child receives all of the nutrients which they need to grow and develop.9 Being active and eating well can help to improve your child’s health and their ability to learn.9 Getting your child into good eating habits from an early age will make them more likely to continue to live a healthy lifestyle as they get older.9

Sometimes it can seem difficult to get your child to eat a wide range of foods, but they all provide different nutrients, so it is very important to try to offer them as much variety as possible.

If you have any concerns, please discuss these with your healthcare professional.

 
 

How can I help my child get through their fussy eating phase?

To help you get your child back on track, we have provided you with tips and guidance – click here for the following:

Alongside working to achieve a healthy, balanced diet, PaediaSure Shake can also help by bridging the gap in essential nutrients during your child’s fussy eating phase. Click here for more information on PaediaSure Shake.

 
 

Should I speak to my doctor about my child’s fussy eating?

Remember that it’s important you look at what your child eats over a week rather than just a day or at each meal to get a better view.8 Try not to worry even if your child’s diet does seem very limited, but if your child is losing weight, seems lethargic, weak and/or irritable, or is suffering from fever, see your healthcare professional.2

 
 

What can I do to avoid feeling stressed or frustrated when my child is being fussy with their food?

Healthy eating doesn’t need to be time-consuming. With busy lives it is important to ensure that you make healthy meals that are easy to prepare and don’t take hours to create. This way if your food is refused by your child, it won’t feel as frustrating or hurtful.

A recent survey of caregivers showed that often people only made 3-5 attempts when introducing a child to a new food.4 However, research suggests that young children need more than 10 exposures to a new food before they accept it.5 Perseverance is key!

Take a look at our Six Sure Steps to raise a child who eats well and our Practical 12-week ‘Back on Track’ eating plan for tips and guidance to help you get your child through their fussy eating phase.

 

If you have any concerns, please discuss these with your healthcare professional.

References

  1. Dovey TM et al. Appetite 2008;50:181-193.
  2. Great Ormond Street Hospital, 2009: http://www.gosh.nhs.uk/medical-information/general-health-advice/food-and-diet/fussy-eaters Accessed 3rd March 2014.
  3. NHS Choices, 2013: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/dealing-with-difficult-behaviour.aspx Accessed 3rd March 2014.
  4. Carruth BR et al. J Am Diet Assoc 2004;104:S57-S64.
  5. Wardle J et al. Appetite 2003;40:155-162.
  6. Powell FC et al. Appetite 2011;57:683-692.
  7. Data on file. Abbott Laboratories Ltd., 2013 (PaediaSure EU DTC study).
  8. NHS Choices, 2013: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/fussy-eaters.aspx Accessed 3rd March 2014.
  9. British Nutrition Foundation, 2004: http://nutrition.org.uk/attachments/110_BNF%20Healthy%20eating%20for%20school-aged%20children.pdf Accessed 3rd March 2014.